National Forum

Football Is Finished

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Replying To Galway9801:  "Pre note,, I've no idea of funding stats,,, I'll defer to your knowledge,, but wasn't the kerry board reduced to collecting money outside of masses a few year ago to pay for the team holiday?"
Our county board usually apply a €10 levy on our allireland final tickets to go towards the kerry team holiday Galway 9801.

KingdomBoy1 (Kerry) - Posts: 13578 - 12/12/2020 08:54:35    2321519

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Replying To GeniusGerry:  "This is one of the better and more factual summaries that I have read about the evolution of Dublin football from an organisational standpoint over the years, there doesn't appear to be any bias in it which is unusual for a piece on this topic. Good read in case anybody missed it:

link"
I read it. It's both interesting and informative.

Greengrass (Louth) - Posts: 5649 - 12/12/2020 09:03:55    2321520

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Replying To GeniusGerry:  "This is one of the better and more factual summaries that I have read about the evolution of Dublin football from an organisational standpoint over the years, there doesn't appear to be any bias in it which is unusual for a piece on this topic. Good read in case anybody missed it:

link"
That was really interesting.

It briefly mentioned development squads at the start and how they helped produce Beano McDonald for Laois.

For me though I actually think that the development squad system has been of huge detriment to a lot of counties.

If there's something that is interesting about Dublin's success is that it's very centrally controlled but decentralised in operation.

The coaching is given widely in the clubs.

They're getting a lot of kids playing a lot of gaelic games at a good standard.

I live in Dublin now, played in Meath and Antrim in my time.

The quality of the underage games in Dublin is startling.
It's very unlike the sort of games you see at underage elsewhere.

All through my time playing club underage on any team there'd be a handful of players who'd dominate the game completely. I don't see that so much when I stop and watch a game in Dublin.

Those kids are all involved in the game in a way that didn't happen in my experience at underage.

If other counties are to get to Dublin's level they need to have a think about how they can replicate that.

People get lost in the money debate and it's certainly helped Dublin get to where they wanted to go and sped up them getting there.

The direction they went towards has proven to be very right and it's important other counties learn from that too.

Whammo86 (Antrim) - Posts: 3534 - 12/12/2020 11:40:08    2321540

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Replying To KillingFields:  "Only get rid of the back door if you completely overhaul the competition and seasons structures.
Counties need more games not far less.

A score handicap doesnt work. No sport at the top level does it. There is multiple competitions across wide range of sports that have some form of backdoor where if you lose you are not knocked out."
I strongly agree with this.

I don't think knockout championship is good for the development of weaker counties.

We've this romantic notion that on their day any team can wander up, have a lash and maybe just maybe pull off the unthinkable.

This year the championship was excellent, it was great to see some shocks. I do worry though that these were in a very unique set of circumstances. Games played later in the year, teams having less opportunity to prepare than is usual.

Outside of this year, the favourites are winning more than ever. You can't just rock up and win. A teams development doesn't even start in the preseason of a given year. You've the top teams playing more top quality matches than the rest and know what and what doesn't help them win having tested it in the heat of battle. The best teams in a normal year are too good to get caught on the hop. The age of analysis and game planning, tactics and optimal decision making isn't just something that comes unstuck out of the blue.

Yes next year Antrim would have a slightly better chance of winning or advancing further in a straight knockout competition but there's a very low chance of that actually happening and I strongly believe that Antrim would have a better chance in the long run of developing over a long number of years to being a competitive team if they played more championship matches. Played more meaningful championship matches, learn and grow to a competitive level.

I'd much rather a shot at Antrim being a good team capable of consistently competing with the best. I think that's achieved by not having a knockout championship where the best play the most and pull away from the rest each and every year. I'd give up the lottery ticket of a romantic run to the latter stages for the opportunity to create real tangible progress which isn't provided by the current structures in my mind.

Antrim lost 18 times in a row in their first game in the Ulster championship. They didn't win a championship game from 1982 to 1999. That sort of thing is not going to be good for any team's development.

Whammo86 (Antrim) - Posts: 3534 - 12/12/2020 12:04:22    2321543

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The Championship has to be restructured, tiered and funded properly. And anyone who thinks a tiered championship wouldn't work is not worth listening to. It works at club level yet at county level it is deemed some sort of insult to be asked to play in the B competition. Make it rewarding, do it right and it can work because what we have now doesn't work.

TheFlaker (Mayo) - Posts: 7297 - 12/12/2020 13:10:40    2321556

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The Championship has to be restructured, tiered and funded properly. And anyone who thinks a tiered championship wouldn't work is not worth listening to. It works at club level yet at county level it is deemed some sort of insult to be asked to play in the B competition. Make it rewarding, do it right and it can work because what we have now doesn't work.

TheFlaker (Mayo) - Posts: 7297 - 12/12/2020 13:58:38    2321559

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Replying To TheFlaker:  "The Championship has to be restructured, tiered and funded properly. And anyone who thinks a tiered championship wouldn't work is not worth listening to. It works at club level yet at county level it is deemed some sort of insult to be asked to play in the B competition. Make it rewarding, do it right and it can work because what we have now doesn't work."
agree 100% any team that thinks it is beneath there standard can go out and win it and then in one year they will be playing at a higher level if they cant win it then they are where they belong. why are we debating this its a no brainer and will in time get at least as much tv coverage as the senior as the games will be more competitive with less defensive football. i would even suggest selling the rights of the senior to sky and sign them up for 10 years now before they realise the tripe they will be getting. By then some one may be able to challenge the dubs but i doubt it.

breffnibluewhite (Cavan) - Posts: 96 - 12/12/2020 14:34:59    2321571

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Replying To Whammo86:  "
Replying To GeniusGerry:  "This is one of the better and more factual summaries that I have read about the evolution of Dublin football from an organisational standpoint over the years, there doesn't appear to be any bias in it which is unusual for a piece on this topic. Good read in case anybody missed it:

link"
That was really interesting.

It briefly mentioned development squads at the start and how they helped produce Beano McDonald for Laois.

For me though I actually think that the development squad system has been of huge detriment to a lot of counties.

If there's something that is interesting about Dublin's success is that it's very centrally controlled but decentralised in operation.

The coaching is given widely in the clubs.

They're getting a lot of kids playing a lot of gaelic games at a good standard.

I live in Dublin now, played in Meath and Antrim in my time.

The quality of the underage games in Dublin is startling.
It's very unlike the sort of games you see at underage elsewhere.

All through my time playing club underage on any team there'd be a handful of players who'd dominate the game completely. I don't see that so much when I stop and watch a game in Dublin.

Those kids are all involved in the game in a way that didn't happen in my experience at underage.

If other counties are to get to Dublin's level they need to have a think about how they can replicate that.

People get lost in the money debate and it's certainly helped Dublin get to where they wanted to go and sped up them getting there.

The direction they went towards has proven to be very right and it's important other counties learn from that too."
I've family involved in a big club in Fingal area coaching kids. 3 other ex Meath players involved in the coaching from u11 down, including a legendary 2 time all Ireland winner with Meath. Other coaches originally from Kildare, Cork and Galway. Of course plenty of Dubs too.
The setup is simply extraordinary from what I've seen - think the professionalism, financial and business links of your typical rugby club people mixed with the incredible spirit and community of a rural country gaa club. There's about a coach for every 7/8 kids and there were over 200 present on the evening I was there rotating around a huge circuit with different skills being practiced at each station. All the coaches have done the expert coaching education courses laid on by the club. Brilliantly organized in a fabulous facility. They even have a main sponsor for the age group (the leading auctioneering practice in the country). This is just one club in Dublin. It's a different planet from the kind of setup what I grew up around I can tell you.

Crinigan (Meath) - Posts: 1098 - 12/12/2020 15:02:12    2321581

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Replying To Greengrass:  "
Replying To GeniusGerry:  "This is one of the better and more factual summaries that I have read about the evolution of Dublin football from an organisational standpoint over the years, there doesn't appear to be any bias in it which is unusual for a piece on this topic. Good read in case anybody missed it:

link"
I read it. It's both interesting and informative."
Couldnt agree personally. His assertion that other counties can follow suit isnt based on the reality of the situation counties are in. Dublin's model is based around their scale. In fact the clue is in how they present themselves when funding is discussed, where they claim to be more like a province - which is in fact exactly what dublin has become.

Who else could roll out that model? The truth of the matter is that nobody could.

The only real issue with it is that this de facto province is competing as a county when all logic and reason show that it shouldnt be

HardCase (USA) - Posts: 64 - 12/12/2020 15:28:11    2321590

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Replying To Crinigan:  "
Replying To Whammo86:  "[quote=GeniusGerry:  "This is one of the better and more factual summaries that I have read about the evolution of Dublin football from an organisational standpoint over the years, there doesn't appear to be any bias in it which is unusual for a piece on this topic. Good read in case anybody missed it:

link"
That was really interesting.

It briefly mentioned development squads at the start and how they helped produce Beano McDonald for Laois.

For me though I actually think that the development squad system has been of huge detriment to a lot of counties.

If there's something that is interesting about Dublin's success is that it's very centrally controlled but decentralised in operation.

The coaching is given widely in the clubs.

They're getting a lot of kids playing a lot of gaelic games at a good standard.

I live in Dublin now, played in Meath and Antrim in my time.

The quality of the underage games in Dublin is startling.
It's very unlike the sort of games you see at underage elsewhere.

All through my time playing club underage on any team there'd be a handful of players who'd dominate the game completely. I don't see that so much when I stop and watch a game in Dublin.

Those kids are all involved in the game in a way that didn't happen in my experience at underage.

If other counties are to get to Dublin's level they need to have a think about how they can replicate that.

People get lost in the money debate and it's certainly helped Dublin get to where they wanted to go and sped up them getting there.

The direction they went towards has proven to be very right and it's important other counties learn from that too."
I've family involved in a big club in Fingal area coaching kids. 3 other ex Meath players involved in the coaching from u11 down, including a legendary 2 time all Ireland winner with Meath. Other coaches originally from Kildare, Cork and Galway. Of course plenty of Dubs too.
The setup is simply extraordinary from what I've seen - think the professionalism, financial and business links of your typical rugby club people mixed with the incredible spirit and community of a rural country gaa club. There's about a coach for every 7/8 kids and there were over 200 present on the evening I was there rotating around a huge circuit with different skills being practiced at each station. All the coaches have done the expert coaching education courses laid on by the club. Brilliantly organized in a fabulous facility. They even have a main sponsor for the age group (the leading auctioneering practice in the country). This is just one club in Dublin. It's a different planet from the kind of setup what I grew up around I can tell you."]It's a starkly different set up to my club too and we have a handful on the senior intercounty panel.

Jackeen (Dublin) - Posts: 4093 - 12/12/2020 16:03:58    2321609

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Replying To Crinigan:  "
Replying To Whammo86:  "[quote=GeniusGerry:  "This is one of the better and more factual summaries that I have read about the evolution of Dublin football from an organisational standpoint over the years, there doesn't appear to be any bias in it which is unusual for a piece on this topic. Good read in case anybody missed it:

link"
That was really interesting.

It briefly mentioned development squads at the start and how they helped produce Beano McDonald for Laois.

For me though I actually think that the development squad system has been of huge detriment to a lot of counties.

If there's something that is interesting about Dublin's success is that it's very centrally controlled but decentralised in operation.

The coaching is given widely in the clubs.

They're getting a lot of kids playing a lot of gaelic games at a good standard.

I live in Dublin now, played in Meath and Antrim in my time.

The quality of the underage games in Dublin is startling.
It's very unlike the sort of games you see at underage elsewhere.

All through my time playing club underage on any team there'd be a handful of players who'd dominate the game completely. I don't see that so much when I stop and watch a game in Dublin.

Those kids are all involved in the game in a way that didn't happen in my experience at underage.

If other counties are to get to Dublin's level they need to have a think about how they can replicate that.

People get lost in the money debate and it's certainly helped Dublin get to where they wanted to go and sped up them getting there.

The direction they went towards has proven to be very right and it's important other counties learn from that too."
I've family involved in a big club in Fingal area coaching kids. 3 other ex Meath players involved in the coaching from u11 down, including a legendary 2 time all Ireland winner with Meath. Other coaches originally from Kildare, Cork and Galway. Of course plenty of Dubs too.
The setup is simply extraordinary from what I've seen - think the professionalism, financial and business links of your typical rugby club people mixed with the incredible spirit and community of a rural country gaa club. There's about a coach for every 7/8 kids and there were over 200 present on the evening I was there rotating around a huge circuit with different skills being practiced at each station. All the coaches have done the expert coaching education courses laid on by the club. Brilliantly organized in a fabulous facility. They even have a main sponsor for the age group (the leading auctioneering practice in the country). This is just one club in Dublin. It's a different planet from the kind of setup what I grew up around I can tell you."]Yes, that's just one club too. It's maybe not quite replicated at all clubs to the same scale but there's elements of it in a lot of clubs.

It's Templeogue Synge Street is the underage team I most often run across playing. This isn't even one of the top top clubs in the county producing this quality of underage football.

In Sandymount on a Saturday you'll see a tonne of Clanna Gael Fotenoy's jerseys on kids. In Sandymount, about as South Dublin as they come Clanna Gael Fotenoy's a fine club with good facilities but no great tradition of winning have outrageous numbers of kids down with them.

This is what's fuelling the machine, I don't know how it gets replicated or adapted elsewhere in the country I just know that if it doesn't it's going to be increasingly hard for other counties to compete.

It is wonderful that the GAA has developed so much in Dublin. It's hurt the spectacle of the inter county championship though too and it's hard to see something that is such a positive story for the GAA also be a source of a very real and difficult problem for the association.

It's like if England had the same take up of rugby as they get in New Zealand and then were taking on Ireland, Scotland, Wales those teams would never get a sniff.

Whammo86 (Antrim) - Posts: 3534 - 12/12/2020 16:04:58    2321610

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Replying To breffnibluewhite:  "agree 100% any team that thinks it is beneath there standard can go out and win it and then in one year they will be playing at a higher level if they cant win it then they are where they belong. why are we debating this its a no brainer and will in time get at least as much tv coverage as the senior as the games will be more competitive with less defensive football. i would even suggest selling the rights of the senior to sky and sign them up for 10 years now before they realise the tripe they will be getting. By then some one may be able to challenge the dubs but i doubt it."
It's all about a long term plan . They need a proper structure in place country wide. I have been involved in a club that went from middle of the road intermediate tipping along not challenging to Intermediate champions and now established senior. Since I retired they have improved the coaching structures underage and have a long term plan. It really annoys me when I hear there is no interest in that kind of tiered championship at inter county.

TheFlaker (Mayo) - Posts: 7297 - 12/12/2020 16:07:13    2321611

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Replying To superbluedub:  "Yes they have a proud football tradition . but the facts are Kerry have 81 Munster titles
And cork dont even have half that with 37 Munster titles , Munster is even more messed up than Leinster"
Maybe so but Kerry were the top team in Ireland for long periods and with no back door Cork were gone early. Fact is that Cork are joined 4thin the roll of honour and Cork are the only team to win an all ireland in last 18 years outside of the Donegal Dublin Kerry Tyrone monopoly. Munster is lopsided no doubt but I'm not sure Leinster much better.

CiarraiMick (Dublin) - Posts: 2732 - 12/12/2020 16:43:06    2321624

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Replying To TheFlaker:  "The Championship has to be restructured, tiered and funded properly. And anyone who thinks a tiered championship wouldn't work is not worth listening to. It works at club level yet at county level it is deemed some sort of insult to be asked to play in the B competition. Make it rewarding, do it right and it can work because what we have now doesn't work."
It works in hurling, ladies football, camogie, and at club level. But football is treated as special for some reason. Every county has a God given right to compete at senior level. League + tiered championship would be far better than what we currently have.

Rolo2010 (Donegal) - Posts: 386 - 12/12/2020 17:17:43    2321636

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Replying To HardCase:  "
Replying To Greengrass:  "[quote=GeniusGerry:  "This is one of the better and more factual summaries that I have read about the evolution of Dublin football from an organisational standpoint over the years, there doesn't appear to be any bias in it which is unusual for a piece on this topic. Good read in case anybody missed it:

link"
I read it. It's both interesting and informative."
Couldnt agree personally. His assertion that other counties can follow suit isnt based on the reality of the situation counties are in. Dublin's model is based around their scale. In fact the clue is in how they present themselves when funding is discussed, where they claim to be more like a province - which is in fact exactly what dublin has become.

Who else could roll out that model? The truth of the matter is that nobody could.

The only real issue with it is that this de facto province is competing as a county when all logic and reason show that it shouldnt be"]Dublin haven't even tapped into the potential they have. They've always had the largest population but Gaelic games have never been stronger in the capital and it will keep getting better. Splitting Dublin in 4 isn't going to happen. At most it could be 2 (north and south of the river) to keep some form of regional identity.

Rolo2010 (Donegal) - Posts: 386 - 12/12/2020 17:28:12    2321642

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Replying To Rolo2010:  "It works in hurling, ladies football, camogie, and at club level. But football is treated as special for some reason. Every county has a God given right to compete at senior level. League + tiered championship would be far better than what we currently have."
Yeah or have a league and championship combination with seedlings based on finishing positions. There are many, many ways.

TheFlaker (Mayo) - Posts: 7297 - 12/12/2020 18:00:15    2321651

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Replying To Rolo2010:  "
Replying To HardCase:  "[quote=Greengrass:  "[quote=GeniusGerry:  "This is one of the better and more factual summaries that I have read about the evolution of Dublin football from an organisational standpoint over the years, there doesn't appear to be any bias in it which is unusual for a piece on this topic. Good read in case anybody missed it:

link"
I read it. It's both interesting and informative."
Couldnt agree personally. His assertion that other counties can follow suit isnt based on the reality of the situation counties are in. Dublin's model is based around their scale. In fact the clue is in how they present themselves when funding is discussed, where they claim to be more like a province - which is in fact exactly what dublin has become.

Who else could roll out that model? The truth of the matter is that nobody could.

The only real issue with it is that this de facto province is competing as a county when all logic and reason show that it shouldnt be"]Dublin haven't even tapped into the potential they have. They've always had the largest population but Gaelic games have never been stronger in the capital and it will keep getting better. Splitting Dublin in 4 isn't going to happen. At most it could be 2 (north and south of the river) to keep some form of regional identity."]population isn't necessarily the reason, if it was Antrim would be the best team in Ulster and second best in Ireland. I believe the GAA should split its money 64 ways with equal amounts going to hurling and football in each county. Dublin would still have a bit advantage in that their ability to get sponsors would be much better than other counties but it would level the playing field a bit. Every county would have to have only one development team at each age group and have a maximum of 36 seniors in a panel. I sound like a communist!!! something needs to be done, but I thought that in 2015 when Kk were in every all Ireland final and winning most of them. Things will change with time and Kerry, Ulster teams and Mayo Galway will get a day in the sun.

Brian_Coyote (Antrim) - Posts: 342 - 12/12/2020 18:02:48    2321652

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Replying To Whammo86:  "
Replying To Crinigan:  "[quote=Whammo86:  "[quote=GeniusGerry:  "This is one of the better and more factual summaries that I have read about the evolution of Dublin football from an organisational standpoint over the years, there doesn't appear to be any bias in it which is unusual for a piece on this topic. Good read in case anybody missed it:

link"
That was really interesting.

It briefly mentioned development squads at the start and how they helped produce Beano McDonald for Laois.

For me though I actually think that the development squad system has been of huge detriment to a lot of counties.

If there's something that is interesting about Dublin's success is that it's very centrally controlled but decentralised in operation.

The coaching is given widely in the clubs.

They're getting a lot of kids playing a lot of gaelic games at a good standard.

I live in Dublin now, played in Meath and Antrim in my time.

The quality of the underage games in Dublin is startling.
It's very unlike the sort of games you see at underage elsewhere.

All through my time playing club underage on any team there'd be a handful of players who'd dominate the game completely. I don't see that so much when I stop and watch a game in Dublin.

Those kids are all involved in the game in a way that didn't happen in my experience at underage.

If other counties are to get to Dublin's level they need to have a think about how they can replicate that.

People get lost in the money debate and it's certainly helped Dublin get to where they wanted to go and sped up them getting there.

The direction they went towards has proven to be very right and it's important other counties learn from that too."
I've family involved in a big club in Fingal area coaching kids. 3 other ex Meath players involved in the coaching from u11 down, including a legendary 2 time all Ireland winner with Meath. Other coaches originally from Kildare, Cork and Galway. Of course plenty of Dubs too.
The setup is simply extraordinary from what I've seen - think the professionalism, financial and business links of your typical rugby club people mixed with the incredible spirit and community of a rural country gaa club. There's about a coach for every 7/8 kids and there were over 200 present on the evening I was there rotating around a huge circuit with different skills being practiced at each station. All the coaches have done the expert coaching education courses laid on by the club. Brilliantly organized in a fabulous facility. They even have a main sponsor for the age group (the leading auctioneering practice in the country). This is just one club in Dublin. It's a different planet from the kind of setup what I grew up around I can tell you."]Yes, that's just one club too. It's maybe not quite replicated at all clubs to the same scale but there's elements of it in a lot of clubs.

It's Templeogue Synge Street is the underage team I most often run across playing. This isn't even one of the top top clubs in the county producing this quality of underage football.

In Sandymount on a Saturday you'll see a tonne of Clanna Gael Fotenoy's jerseys on kids. In Sandymount, about as South Dublin as they come Clanna Gael Fotenoy's a fine club with good facilities but no great tradition of winning have outrageous numbers of kids down with them.

This is what's fuelling the machine, I don't know how it gets replicated or adapted elsewhere in the country I just know that if it doesn't it's going to be increasingly hard for other counties to compete.

It is wonderful that the GAA has developed so much in Dublin. It's hurt the spectacle of the inter county championship though too and it's hard to see something that is such a positive story for the GAA also be a source of a very real and difficult problem for the association.

It's like if England had the same take up of rugby as they get in New Zealand and then were taking on Ireland, Scotland, Wales those teams would never get a sniff."]GAA and Dublin have to do the right thing and split in 4. Even then they'd still have population and funding advantage but it would be much fairer. But the Dubs can't even entertain the discussion, they somehow still think there is glory and honour in their recent success.

Crinigan (Meath) - Posts: 1098 - 12/12/2020 19:46:28    2321681

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Replying To TheUsername:  "The Kerry team holiday cost 310k in 2019, Diramuid Connolly must have been saying mass."
in all honesty what any team spends on a team holiday is only relevant to the counties involved and supporters who might have contributed.The gaa did nt pay for Kerry s holiday.it was done by fundraising and donations from Kerry supporters.Dublin go on big holidays also with all the frills.I agree that teams deserve a holiday with mentors wives and girlfriends and I contribute myself to both Kerry and Dublin team holidays in a small way.I don't like the hangers on getting free holidays out of supporters donations though.

CiarraiMick (Dublin) - Posts: 2732 - 12/12/2020 19:48:24    2321682

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Replying To Crinigan:  "
Replying To Whammo86:  "[quote=Crinigan:  "[quote=Whammo86:  "[quote=GeniusGerry:  "This is one of the better and more factual summaries that I have read about the evolution of Dublin football from an organisational standpoint over the years, there doesn't appear to be any bias in it which is unusual for a piece on this topic. Good read in case anybody missed it:

link"
That was really interesting.

It briefly mentioned development squads at the start and how they helped produce Beano McDonald for Laois.

For me though I actually think that the development squad system has been of huge detriment to a lot of counties.

If there's something that is interesting about Dublin's success is that it's very centrally controlled but decentralised in operation.

The coaching is given widely in the clubs.

They're getting a lot of kids playing a lot of gaelic games at a good standard.

I live in Dublin now, played in Meath and Antrim in my time.

The quality of the underage games in Dublin is startling.
It's very unlike the sort of games you see at underage elsewhere.

All through my time playing club underage on any team there'd be a handful of players who'd dominate the game completely. I don't see that so much when I stop and watch a game in Dublin.

Those kids are all involved in the game in a way that didn't happen in my experience at underage.

If other counties are to get to Dublin's level they need to have a think about how they can replicate that.

People get lost in the money debate and it's certainly helped Dublin get to where they wanted to go and sped up them getting there.

The direction they went towards has proven to be very right and it's important other counties learn from that too."
I've family involved in a big club in Fingal area coaching kids. 3 other ex Meath players involved in the coaching from u11 down, including a legendary 2 time all Ireland winner with Meath. Other coaches originally from Kildare, Cork and Galway. Of course plenty of Dubs too.
The setup is simply extraordinary from what I've seen - think the professionalism, financial and business links of your typical rugby club people mixed with the incredible spirit and community of a rural country gaa club. There's about a coach for every 7/8 kids and there were over 200 present on the evening I was there rotating around a huge circuit with different skills being practiced at each station. All the coaches have done the expert coaching education courses laid on by the club. Brilliantly organized in a fabulous facility. They even have a main sponsor for the age group (the leading auctioneering practice in the country). This is just one club in Dublin. It's a different planet from the kind of setup what I grew up around I can tell you."]Yes, that's just one club too. It's maybe not quite replicated at all clubs to the same scale but there's elements of it in a lot of clubs.

It's Templeogue Synge Street is the underage team I most often run across playing. This isn't even one of the top top clubs in the county producing this quality of underage football.

In Sandymount on a Saturday you'll see a tonne of Clanna Gael Fotenoy's jerseys on kids. In Sandymount, about as South Dublin as they come Clanna Gael Fotenoy's a fine club with good facilities but no great tradition of winning have outrageous numbers of kids down with them.

This is what's fuelling the machine, I don't know how it gets replicated or adapted elsewhere in the country I just know that if it doesn't it's going to be increasingly hard for other counties to compete.

It is wonderful that the GAA has developed so much in Dublin. It's hurt the spectacle of the inter county championship though too and it's hard to see something that is such a positive story for the GAA also be a source of a very real and difficult problem for the association.

It's like if England had the same take up of rugby as they get in New Zealand and then were taking on Ireland, Scotland, Wales those teams would never get a sniff."]GAA and Dublin have to do the right thing and split in 4. Even then they'd still have population and funding advantage but it would be much fairer. But the Dubs can't even entertain the discussion, they somehow still think there is glory and honour in their recent success."]They won't entertain it because Dublin is their county and not South Dublin or Dun Laoghaire-Rathdown.

Rolo2010 (Donegal) - Posts: 386 - 12/12/2020 20:31:39    2321691

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