National Forum

Glimmers Of New Light In A Corner Of Munster Not Associated With Hurling And Camogie

(Oldest Posts First)


With five strong hurling powers in Munster, Kerry is usually grouped withy developing and weaker counties.
But in recent years both Camogie and Hurling have been undergoing a slow but steady renaissance in the greater Tralee area. Green shoots also in the Killarney area. Traditionally the big 8 senior clubs in North Kerry demark the hurling stronghold. But new names are starting to come to the table. Dr. Crokes broke the glass ceiling a couple of seasons ago, winning the Intermediate Hurling tile and unlike their predecessors, opting to join the top table as a reward.

On the Camogie side, Tralee Parnells have a growing juvenile and teenage membership that is now the largest in the county. With plans to expand and play more games this season, the Camogie management have launched a recruitment drive. (Details at this link.)

The club are now also coming of age on the hurling side, with the under 21s securing the first Tralee adult silverware in over a century. (Story at this link .)

What do others who have been in similar situations think? What are the dos and don'ts for growing clubs like these, on the development track in non-traditional Hurling and Camogie areas and what lessons learned elsewhere may be applicable?

MikeRoger (Kerry) - Posts: 8 - 25/01/2022 15:59:42    2396420

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Replying To MikeRoger:  "With five strong hurling powers in Munster, Kerry is usually grouped withy developing and weaker counties.
But in recent years both Camogie and Hurling have been undergoing a slow but steady renaissance in the greater Tralee area. Green shoots also in the Killarney area. Traditionally the big 8 senior clubs in North Kerry demark the hurling stronghold. But new names are starting to come to the table. Dr. Crokes broke the glass ceiling a couple of seasons ago, winning the Intermediate Hurling tile and unlike their predecessors, opting to join the top table as a reward.

On the Camogie side, Tralee Parnells have a growing juvenile and teenage membership that is now the largest in the county. With plans to expand and play more games this season, the Camogie management have launched a recruitment drive. (Details at this link.)

The club are now also coming of age on the hurling side, with the under 21s securing the first Tralee adult silverware in over a century. (Story at this link .)

What do others who have been in similar situations think? What are the dos and don'ts for growing clubs like these, on the development track in non-traditional Hurling and Camogie areas and what lessons learned elsewhere may be applicable?"
Great to see, North county Dublin was bit of a hurling desert until they started to encourage traditionally football - some of them exclusively football - clubs to set up hurling sections. There was also a Fingal NHL team for a while that played in Division 3. Mixed results and not an option for Kerry. Working well enough at club level.

Great to see the Kerry clubs and indeed Naas doing well. It is not a genetic trait for all that some people would have you believe and as my Tipp grandad firmly stood by!

BarneyGrant (Dublin) - Posts: 623 - 25/01/2022 16:35:55    2396433

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Replying To MikeRoger:  "With five strong hurling powers in Munster, Kerry is usually grouped withy developing and weaker counties.
But in recent years both Camogie and Hurling have been undergoing a slow but steady renaissance in the greater Tralee area. Green shoots also in the Killarney area. Traditionally the big 8 senior clubs in North Kerry demark the hurling stronghold. But new names are starting to come to the table. Dr. Crokes broke the glass ceiling a couple of seasons ago, winning the Intermediate Hurling tile and unlike their predecessors, opting to join the top table as a reward.

On the Camogie side, Tralee Parnells have a growing juvenile and teenage membership that is now the largest in the county. With plans to expand and play more games this season, the Camogie management have launched a recruitment drive. (Details at this link.)

The club are now also coming of age on the hurling side, with the under 21s securing the first Tralee adult silverware in over a century. (Story at this link .)

What do others who have been in similar situations think? What are the dos and don'ts for growing clubs like these, on the development track in non-traditional Hurling and Camogie areas and what lessons learned elsewhere may be applicable?"
Stacks won the senior hurling championship in 1933. Doesn't that count as Tralee adult silverware within 100 years?

foreveryoung (USA) - Posts: 1149 - 25/01/2022 21:46:28    2396481

Link

Replying To BarneyGrant:  "
Replying To MikeRoger:  "With five strong hurling powers in Munster, Kerry is usually grouped withy developing and weaker counties.
But in recent years both Camogie and Hurling have been undergoing a slow but steady renaissance in the greater Tralee area. Green shoots also in the Killarney area. Traditionally the big 8 senior clubs in North Kerry demark the hurling stronghold. But new names are starting to come to the table. Dr. Crokes broke the glass ceiling a couple of seasons ago, winning the Intermediate Hurling tile and unlike their predecessors, opting to join the top table as a reward.

On the Camogie side, Tralee Parnells have a growing juvenile and teenage membership that is now the largest in the county. With plans to expand and play more games this season, the Camogie management have launched a recruitment drive. (Details at this link.)

The club are now also coming of age on the hurling side, with the under 21s securing the first Tralee adult silverware in over a century. (Story at this link .)

What do others who have been in similar situations think? What are the dos and don'ts for growing clubs like these, on the development track in non-traditional Hurling and Camogie areas and what lessons learned elsewhere may be applicable?"
Great to see, North county Dublin was bit of a hurling desert until they started to encourage traditionally football - some of them exclusively football - clubs to set up hurling sections. There was also a Fingal NHL team for a while that played in Division 3. Mixed results and not an option for Kerry. Working well enough at club level.

Great to see the Kerry clubs and indeed Naas doing well. It is not a genetic trait for all that some people would have you believe and as my Tipp grandad firmly stood by!"
Thanks Barney.

Good to hear encouraging words about people from all over, who want to grow the hurling map beyond traditional areas and about non-hurling clubs embracing hurling. What we found was that once any structures are in place, you will see families vote with their feet and support it by sending their children to try it out. I do agree that it does not have to be genetic in children to take it up and thrive at it. But a few "born into it" advocates to help start things off, definitely does not go astray. We will be forever in the debt of hurling evangelists like Paudie Butler, George O'Connor, Martin Fogarty and many others who helped us with "train the trainer" sessions and other support and encouragement in our earlier years as a young club.

MikeRoger (Kerry) - Posts: 8 - 26/01/2022 20:19:37    2396638

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When you see the hurling skill of Slaughtneil and other Northern clubs in Down, Antrim, etc. you would wonder what is wrong with the format of competitions that these counties don't advance. Or maybe it is the lack of interest. Hurling is easy enough to play but difficult to play well and compete at the top. I am not patronizing these counties either because the clubs have shown what they are capable of.
The situation with Kerry in Muster is also idiotic whether it is their own doing or the Munster powers that be. A lot of top hurling coaches have gone down there. They take a step up and then two steps backwards. I pity Molumphy he get a result and them hammered. It would be better if they got within a few points of Tipp (even their second string) and kept the result in single digits against Limerick when they get a chance to play them.

Canuck (Waterford) - Posts: 2006 - 26/01/2022 21:18:24    2396648

Link

Replying To MikeRoger:  "
Replying To BarneyGrant:  "[quote=MikeRoger:  "With five strong hurling powers in Munster, Kerry is usually grouped withy developing and weaker counties.
But in recent years both Camogie and Hurling have been undergoing a slow but steady renaissance in the greater Tralee area. Green shoots also in the Killarney area. Traditionally the big 8 senior clubs in North Kerry demark the hurling stronghold. But new names are starting to come to the table. Dr. Crokes broke the glass ceiling a couple of seasons ago, winning the Intermediate Hurling tile and unlike their predecessors, opting to join the top table as a reward.

On the Camogie side, Tralee Parnells have a growing juvenile and teenage membership that is now the largest in the county. With plans to expand and play more games this season, the Camogie management have launched a recruitment drive. (Details at this link.)

The club are now also coming of age on the hurling side, with the under 21s securing the first Tralee adult silverware in over a century. (Story at this link .)

What do others who have been in similar situations think? What are the dos and don'ts for growing clubs like these, on the development track in non-traditional Hurling and Camogie areas and what lessons learned elsewhere may be applicable?"
Great to see, North county Dublin was bit of a hurling desert until they started to encourage traditionally football - some of them exclusively football - clubs to set up hurling sections. There was also a Fingal NHL team for a while that played in Division 3. Mixed results and not an option for Kerry. Working well enough at club level.

Great to see the Kerry clubs and indeed Naas doing well. It is not a genetic trait for all that some people would have you believe and as my Tipp grandad firmly stood by!"
Thanks Barney.

Good to hear encouraging words about people from all over, who want to grow the hurling map beyond traditional areas and about non-hurling clubs embracing hurling. What we found was that once any structures are in place, you will see families vote with their feet and support it by sending their children to try it out. I do agree that it does not have to be genetic in children to take it up and thrive at it. But a few "born into it" advocates to help start things off, definitely does not go astray. We will be forever in the debt of hurling evangelists like Paudie Butler, George O'Connor, Martin Fogarty and many others who helped us with "train the trainer" sessions and other support and encouragement in our earlier years as a young club."]Agree 100% about people with experience being vital. Like the lads you mention, Dublin overall has always benefitted from people from the "traditional" counties either playing or being involved in coaching and managing. That was certainly a factor in north county as was Dublin lads from city hurling clubs moving out and getting involved.

Kids love hurling and if it's in the schools and properly coached and organised at underage then there's no reason it cannot be played at high standard. I have family who have been involved in Kildare and Naas is exemplary on all those levels.

That may or may not - as with Kerry clubs - reflect itself consistently at senior level given the dominance of football in your own county and Kildare even more so than in Dublin which has a bigger pool anyway - but that's not the objective at the end of the day. Well, not immediately.

BarneyGrant (Dublin) - Posts: 623 - 27/01/2022 11:39:57    2396693

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Great to see/hear, MikeRoger. Regular games is my recommendation. And if you're not getting enough games in Kerry try to supplement it with games in a nearby county Limerick/Cork/Tipp. This will help improve your young players skill levels organically.

Naas underage teams play in the Dublin & Kilkenny leagues, for example. The more their skills improve, the more competitive they will be & their grá for the game will increase.

keeper7 (Longford) - Posts: 4024 - 27/01/2022 16:54:02    2396759

Link

Replying To BarneyGrant:  "
Replying To MikeRoger:  "[quote=BarneyGrant:  "[quote=MikeRoger:  "With five strong hurling powers in Munster, Kerry is usually grouped withy developing and weaker counties.
But in recent years both Camogie and Hurling have been undergoing a slow but steady renaissance in the greater Tralee area. Green shoots also in the Killarney area. Traditionally the big 8 senior clubs in North Kerry demark the hurling stronghold. But new names are starting to come to the table. Dr. Crokes broke the glass ceiling a couple of seasons ago, winning the Intermediate Hurling tile and unlike their predecessors, opting to join the top table as a reward.

On the Camogie side, Tralee Parnells have a growing juvenile and teenage membership that is now the largest in the county. With plans to expand and play more games this season, the Camogie management have launched a recruitment drive. (Details at this link.)

The club are now also coming of age on the hurling side, with the under 21s securing the first Tralee adult silverware in over a century. (Story at this link .)

What do others who have been in similar situations think? What are the dos and don'ts for growing clubs like these, on the development track in non-traditional Hurling and Camogie areas and what lessons learned elsewhere may be applicable?"
Great to see, North county Dublin was bit of a hurling desert until they started to encourage traditionally football - some of them exclusively football - clubs to set up hurling sections. There was also a Fingal NHL team for a while that played in Division 3. Mixed results and not an option for Kerry. Working well enough at club level.

Great to see the Kerry clubs and indeed Naas doing well. It is not a genetic trait for all that some people would have you believe and as my Tipp grandad firmly stood by!"
Thanks Barney.

Good to hear encouraging words about people from all over, who want to grow the hurling map beyond traditional areas and about non-hurling clubs embracing hurling. What we found was that once any structures are in place, you will see families vote with their feet and support it by sending their children to try it out. I do agree that it does not have to be genetic in children to take it up and thrive at it. But a few "born into it" advocates to help start things off, definitely does not go astray. We will be forever in the debt of hurling evangelists like Paudie Butler, George O'Connor, Martin Fogarty and many others who helped us with "train the trainer" sessions and other support and encouragement in our earlier years as a young club."]Agree 100% about people with experience being vital. Like the lads you mention, Dublin overall has always benefitted from people from the "traditional" counties either playing or being involved in coaching and managing. That was certainly a factor in north county as was Dublin lads from city hurling clubs moving out and getting involved.

Kids love hurling and if it's in the schools and properly coached and organised at underage then there's no reason it cannot be played at high standard. I have family who have been involved in Kildare and Naas is exemplary on all those levels.

That may or may not - as with Kerry clubs - reflect itself consistently at senior level given the dominance of football in your own county and Kildare even more so than in Dublin which has a bigger pool anyway - but that's not the objective at the end of the day. Well, not immediately."]Hurling for kids should be about teaching skills and hitting the ball right and left hand over and over and over. I am sure it is practiced. Strengthening the wrist for hitting out a bit from the body as well as close. A bucket of rice is good for building strength in the wrist. We used to be run into the ground doing 100 meter sprints. Nonsense it is who ever is quickest to the ball over the first five steps gets it and does not have to deal with the challenge. Once the skills are perfected is time enough for body building.

Canuck (Waterford) - Posts: 2006 - 27/01/2022 19:24:42    2396778

Link

Replying To BarneyGrant:  "
Replying To MikeRoger:  "[quote=BarneyGrant:  "[quote=MikeRoger:  "With five strong hurling powers in Munster, Kerry is usually grouped withy developing and weaker counties.
But in recent years both Camogie and Hurling have been undergoing a slow but steady renaissance in the greater Tralee area. Green shoots also in the Killarney area. Traditionally the big 8 senior clubs in North Kerry demark the hurling stronghold. But new names are starting to come to the table. Dr. Crokes broke the glass ceiling a couple of seasons ago, winning the Intermediate Hurling tile and unlike their predecessors, opting to join the top table as a reward.

On the Camogie side, Tralee Parnells have a growing juvenile and teenage membership that is now the largest in the county. With plans to expand and play more games this season, the Camogie management have launched a recruitment drive. (Details at this link.)

The club are now also coming of age on the hurling side, with the under 21s securing the first Tralee adult silverware in over a century. (Story at this link .)

What do others who have been in similar situations think? What are the dos and don'ts for growing clubs like these, on the development track in non-traditional Hurling and Camogie areas and what lessons learned elsewhere may be applicable?"
Great to see, North county Dublin was bit of a hurling desert until they started to encourage traditionally football - some of them exclusively football - clubs to set up hurling sections. There was also a Fingal NHL team for a while that played in Division 3. Mixed results and not an option for Kerry. Working well enough at club level.

Great to see the Kerry clubs and indeed Naas doing well. It is not a genetic trait for all that some people would have you believe and as my Tipp grandad firmly stood by!"
Thanks Barney.

Good to hear encouraging words about people from all over, who want to grow the hurling map beyond traditional areas and about non-hurling clubs embracing hurling. What we found was that once any structures are in place, you will see families vote with their feet and support it by sending their children to try it out. I do agree that it does not have to be genetic in children to take it up and thrive at it. But a few "born into it" advocates to help start things off, definitely does not go astray. We will be forever in the debt of hurling evangelists like Paudie Butler, George O'Connor, Martin Fogarty and many others who helped us with "train the trainer" sessions and other support and encouragement in our earlier years as a young club."]Agree 100% about people with experience being vital. Like the lads you mention, Dublin overall has always benefitted from people from the "traditional" counties either playing or being involved in coaching and managing. That was certainly a factor in north county as was Dublin lads from city hurling clubs moving out and getting involved.

Kids love hurling and if it's in the schools and properly coached and organised at underage then there's no reason it cannot be played at high standard. I have family who have been involved in Kildare and Naas is exemplary on all those levels.

That may or may not - as with Kerry clubs - reflect itself consistently at senior level given the dominance of football in your own county and Kildare even more so than in Dublin which has a bigger pool anyway - but that's not the objective at the end of the day. Well, not immediately."].
.
Yes indeed, I agree 100% that showing success at senior level is not the short or medium term objective. It may come in the longer term and hopefully it will at least on occasion. We certainly hope to see more days like this one
traleeparnellshurling.blogspot.com/2022/01/tralee-parnells-first-adult-silverware.html and other success stories we have been glad to share at traleeparnellshurling.blogspot.com
.
.
But the plan for the foreseeable has to be to give more and more children the opportunity to experience these fantastic, skillful, ancient and exciting sports. As a visiting development mentor told us a few years ago, the best time to plant and oak tree is 20 years ago, but the second best plan, is to get on with sowing acorns today. So on that topic, please share this posting on your social media or elsewhere. We would also like you to tag and share to anybody you know who may be interested in taking up Camogie or coming back to the sport, or who may know somebody who might welcome the chance to be part of a very progressive, welcoming and dynamic voluntary organisation, in the town of Tralee where both Camogie and Hurling are very definitely on the up and have a very bright future. More info at:- traleeparnellshurling.blogspot.com/2022/01/tralee-parnells-adult-camogie.html
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Is mise le meas.

MikeRoger (Kerry) - Posts: 8 - 28/01/2022 19:52:54    2396904

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Replying To MikeRoger:  "
Replying To BarneyGrant:  "[quote=MikeRoger:  "With five strong hurling powers in Munster, Kerry is usually grouped withy developing and weaker counties.
But in recent years both Camogie and Hurling have been undergoing a slow but steady renaissance in the greater Tralee area. Green shoots also in the Killarney area. Traditionally the big 8 senior clubs in North Kerry demark the hurling stronghold. But new names are starting to come to the table. Dr. Crokes broke the glass ceiling a couple of seasons ago, winning the Intermediate Hurling tile and unlike their predecessors, opting to join the top table as a reward.

On the Camogie side, Tralee Parnells have a growing juvenile and teenage membership that is now the largest in the county. With plans to expand and play more games this season, the Camogie management have launched a recruitment drive. (Details at this link.)

The club are now also coming of age on the hurling side, with the under 21s securing the first Tralee adult silverware in over a century. (Story at this link .)

What do others who have been in similar situations think? What are the dos and don'ts for growing clubs like these, on the development track in non-traditional Hurling and Camogie areas and what lessons learned elsewhere may be applicable?"
Great to see, North county Dublin was bit of a hurling desert until they started to encourage traditionally football - some of them exclusively football - clubs to set up hurling sections. There was also a Fingal NHL team for a while that played in Division 3. Mixed results and not an option for Kerry. Working well enough at club level.

Great to see the Kerry clubs and indeed Naas doing well. It is not a genetic trait for all that some people would have you believe and as my Tipp grandad firmly stood by!"
Thanks Barney.

Good to hear encouraging words about people from all over, who want to grow the hurling map beyond traditional areas and about non-hurling clubs embracing hurling. What we found was that once any structures are in place, you will see families vote with their feet and support it by sending their children to try it out. I do agree that it does not have to be genetic in children to take it up and thrive at it. But a few "born into it" advocates to help start things off, definitely does not go astray. We will be forever in the debt of hurling evangelists like Paudie Butler, George O'Connor, Martin Fogarty and many others who helped us with "train the trainer" sessions and other support and encouragement in our earlier years as a young club."]The thing about hurling isnt genetics. Like everything in life, from maths to learning a foreign language, hurling is easier to pick up when you are younger and most of the skills are honed not at a clubs under 5s or under 7s training sessions but at home during the week between club training sessions. In areas with little or no hurling lads likely dont have fathers, older brothers or friends to puck a ball around with after school or at the weekends and this is where kids learn to pick the ball up cleanly under pressure and learn to strike the ball better. Training sessions will teach the techniques but putting the hours in between them is the only way lads get good at the skills.

Viking66 (Wexford) - Posts: 4732 - 29/01/2022 10:35:24    2396930

Link

Replying To MikeRoger:  "
Replying To BarneyGrant:  "[quote=MikeRoger:  "With five strong hurling powers in Munster, Kerry is usually grouped withy developing and weaker counties.
But in recent years both Camogie and Hurling have been undergoing a slow but steady renaissance in the greater Tralee area. Green shoots also in the Killarney area. Traditionally the big 8 senior clubs in North Kerry demark the hurling stronghold. But new names are starting to come to the table. Dr. Crokes broke the glass ceiling a couple of seasons ago, winning the Intermediate Hurling tile and unlike their predecessors, opting to join the top table as a reward.

On the Camogie side, Tralee Parnells have a growing juvenile and teenage membership that is now the largest in the county. With plans to expand and play more games this season, the Camogie management have launched a recruitment drive. (Details at this link.)

The club are now also coming of age on the hurling side, with the under 21s securing the first Tralee adult silverware in over a century. (Story at this link .)

What do others who have been in similar situations think? What are the dos and don'ts for growing clubs like these, on the development track in non-traditional Hurling and Camogie areas and what lessons learned elsewhere may be applicable?"
Great to see, North county Dublin was bit of a hurling desert until they started to encourage traditionally football - some of them exclusively football - clubs to set up hurling sections. There was also a Fingal NHL team for a while that played in Division 3. Mixed results and not an option for Kerry. Working well enough at club level.

Great to see the Kerry clubs and indeed Naas doing well. It is not a genetic trait for all that some people would have you believe and as my Tipp grandad firmly stood by!"
Thanks Barney.

Good to hear encouraging words about people from all over, who want to grow the hurling map beyond traditional areas and about non-hurling clubs embracing hurling. What we found was that once any structures are in place, you will see families vote with their feet and support it by sending their children to try it out. I do agree that it does not have to be genetic in children to take it up and thrive at it. But a few "born into it" advocates to help start things off, definitely does not go astray. We will be forever in the debt of hurling evangelists like Paudie Butler, George O'Connor, Martin Fogarty and many others who helped us with "train the trainer" sessions and other support and encouragement in our earlier years as a young club."]The thing about hurling isnt genetics. Like everything in life, from maths to learning a foreign language, hurling is easier to pick up when you are younger and most of the skills are honed not at a clubs under 5s or under 7s training sessions but at home during the week between club training sessions. In areas with little or no hurling lads likely dont have fathers, older brothers or friends to puck a ball around with after school or at the weekends and this is where kids learn to pick the ball up cleanly under pressure and learn to strike the ball better. Training sessions will teach the techniques but putting the hours in between them is the only way lads get good at the skills.

Viking66 (Wexford) - Posts: 4732 - 29/01/2022 10:35:50    2396931

Link

Replying To MikeRoger:  "
Replying To BarneyGrant:  "[quote=MikeRoger:  "With five strong hurling powers in Munster, Kerry is usually grouped withy developing and weaker counties.
But in recent years both Camogie and Hurling have been undergoing a slow but steady renaissance in the greater Tralee area. Green shoots also in the Killarney area. Traditionally the big 8 senior clubs in North Kerry demark the hurling stronghold. But new names are starting to come to the table. Dr. Crokes broke the glass ceiling a couple of seasons ago, winning the Intermediate Hurling tile and unlike their predecessors, opting to join the top table as a reward.

On the Camogie side, Tralee Parnells have a growing juvenile and teenage membership that is now the largest in the county. With plans to expand and play more games this season, the Camogie management have launched a recruitment drive. (Details at this link.)

The club are now also coming of age on the hurling side, with the under 21s securing the first Tralee adult silverware in over a century. (Story at this link .)

What do others who have been in similar situations think? What are the dos and don'ts for growing clubs like these, on the development track in non-traditional Hurling and Camogie areas and what lessons learned elsewhere may be applicable?"
Great to see, North county Dublin was bit of a hurling desert until they started to encourage traditionally football - some of them exclusively football - clubs to set up hurling sections. There was also a Fingal NHL team for a while that played in Division 3. Mixed results and not an option for Kerry. Working well enough at club level.

Great to see the Kerry clubs and indeed Naas doing well. It is not a genetic trait for all that some people would have you believe and as my Tipp grandad firmly stood by!"
Thanks Barney.

Good to hear encouraging words about people from all over, who want to grow the hurling map beyond traditional areas and about non-hurling clubs embracing hurling. What we found was that once any structures are in place, you will see families vote with their feet and support it by sending their children to try it out. I do agree that it does not have to be genetic in children to take it up and thrive at it. But a few "born into it" advocates to help start things off, definitely does not go astray. We will be forever in the debt of hurling evangelists like Paudie Butler, George O'Connor, Martin Fogarty and many others who helped us with "train the trainer" sessions and other support and encouragement in our earlier years as a young club."]Fair play to you Mike for the effort you are obviously putting in.

Viking66 (Wexford) - Posts: 4732 - 29/01/2022 10:36:55    2396932

Link

Replying To Viking66:  "
Replying To MikeRoger:  "[quote=BarneyGrant:  "[quote=MikeRoger:  "With five strong hurling powers in Munster, Kerry is usually grouped withy developing and weaker counties.
But in recent years both Camogie and Hurling have been undergoing a slow but steady renaissance in the greater Tralee area. Green shoots also in the Killarney area. Traditionally the big 8 senior clubs in North Kerry demark the hurling stronghold. But new names are starting to come to the table. Dr. Crokes broke the glass ceiling a couple of seasons ago, winning the Intermediate Hurling tile and unlike their predecessors, opting to join the top table as a reward.

On the Camogie side, Tralee Parnells have a growing juvenile and teenage membership that is now the largest in the county. With plans to expand and play more games this season, the Camogie management have launched a recruitment drive. (Details at this link.)

The club are now also coming of age on the hurling side, with the under 21s securing the first Tralee adult silverware in over a century. (Story at this link .)

What do others who have been in similar situations think? What are the dos and don'ts for growing clubs like these, on the development track in non-traditional Hurling and Camogie areas and what lessons learned elsewhere may be applicable?"
Great to see, North county Dublin was bit of a hurling desert until they started to encourage traditionally football - some of them exclusively football - clubs to set up hurling sections. There was also a Fingal NHL team for a while that played in Division 3. Mixed results and not an option for Kerry. Working well enough at club level.

Great to see the Kerry clubs and indeed Naas doing well. It is not a genetic trait for all that some people would have you believe and as my Tipp grandad firmly stood by!"
Thanks Barney.

Good to hear encouraging words about people from all over, who want to grow the hurling map beyond traditional areas and about non-hurling clubs embracing hurling. What we found was that once any structures are in place, you will see families vote with their feet and support it by sending their children to try it out. I do agree that it does not have to be genetic in children to take it up and thrive at it. But a few "born into it" advocates to help start things off, definitely does not go astray. We will be forever in the debt of hurling evangelists like Paudie Butler, George O'Connor, Martin Fogarty and many others who helped us with "train the trainer" sessions and other support and encouragement in our earlier years as a young club."]Fair play to you Mike for the effort you are obviously putting in."].
Thanks @Viking66.
.
At this stage we are very luck to have dozens of volunteers putting in the effort, from officers to mentors to all the support roles you need in a busy club. We were very fortunate that at the junctures where we had been successful in recruiting girls and boys, to the point where we could almost not cope with the new numbers, we were able to get new parents from those recruits to come aboard and do their foundation and level 1 certificates and vetting and become part of the growth of the club. But our numbers continue to increase, so we always need more. If anyone knows of Camogie and Hurling people from other counties in our vicinity or moving this way, please pass this message on.

Too many to list individually at this stage, but we are able to give some of our volunteers mention ever week in our notes and on our social media at e.g.

https://traleeparnellshurling.blogspot.com/

MikeRoger (Kerry) - Posts: 8 - 30/01/2022 10:41:16    2397108

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Replying To foreveryoung:  "
Replying To MikeRoger:  "With five strong hurling powers in Munster, Kerry is usually grouped withy developing and weaker counties.
But in recent years both Camogie and Hurling have been undergoing a slow but steady renaissance in the greater Tralee area. Green shoots also in the Killarney area. Traditionally the big 8 senior clubs in North Kerry demark the hurling stronghold. But new names are starting to come to the table. Dr. Crokes broke the glass ceiling a couple of seasons ago, winning the Intermediate Hurling tile and unlike their predecessors, opting to join the top table as a reward.

On the Camogie side, Tralee Parnells have a growing juvenile and teenage membership that is now the largest in the county. With plans to expand and play more games this season, the Camogie management have launched a recruitment drive. (Details at this link.)

The club are now also coming of age on the hurling side, with the under 21s securing the first Tralee adult silverware in over a century. (Story at this link .)

What do others who have been in similar situations think? What are the dos and don'ts for growing clubs like these, on the development track in non-traditional Hurling and Camogie areas and what lessons learned elsewhere may be applicable?"
Stacks won the senior hurling championship in 1933. Doesn't that count as Tralee adult silverware within 100 years?"
.
Thanks for spotting that typo. The post should of course specify tralee-parnells-first-adult-silverware as it has it correctly in the link to
https://traleeparnellshurling.blogspot.com/2022/01/tralee-parnells-first-adult-silverware.html

But being new to this forum, having looked around, I have not figured out yet how to edit / correct a post. Would anyone who is more familiar with the hoganstand Forum be able to tell, how a correction can be made in a case like this please?

MikeRoger (Kerry) - Posts: 8 - 31/01/2022 18:44:34    2397585

Link

Replying To MikeRoger:  "
Replying To foreveryoung:  "[quote=MikeRoger:  "With five strong hurling powers in Munster, Kerry is usually grouped withy developing and weaker counties.
But in recent years both Camogie and Hurling have been undergoing a slow but steady renaissance in the greater Tralee area. Green shoots also in the Killarney area. Traditionally the big 8 senior clubs in North Kerry demark the hurling stronghold. But new names are starting to come to the table. Dr. Crokes broke the glass ceiling a couple of seasons ago, winning the Intermediate Hurling tile and unlike their predecessors, opting to join the top table as a reward.

On the Camogie side, Tralee Parnells have a growing juvenile and teenage membership that is now the largest in the county. With plans to expand and play more games this season, the Camogie management have launched a recruitment drive. (Details at this link.)

The club are now also coming of age on the hurling side, with the under 21s securing the first Tralee adult silverware in over a century. (Story at this link .)

What do others who have been in similar situations think? What are the dos and don'ts for growing clubs like these, on the development track in non-traditional Hurling and Camogie areas and what lessons learned elsewhere may be applicable?"
Stacks won the senior hurling championship in 1933. Doesn't that count as Tralee adult silverware within 100 years?"
.
Thanks for spotting that typo. The post should of course specify tralee-parnells-first-adult-silverware as it has it correctly in the link to
https://traleeparnellshurling.blogspot.com/2022/01/tralee-parnells-first-adult-silverware.html

But being new to this forum, having looked around, I have not figured out yet how to edit / correct a post. Would anyone who is more familiar with the hoganstand Forum be able to tell, how a correction can be made in a case like this please?"]I don't know how to change stuff either. However, there's no need to change it. It's not such a big issue. I greatly enjoyed reading your post, and as many others have said, it's great news.

Also, I've read that Rathmore might be entering a hurling team this year.

Kerry hurling is on the up at the moment. Hopefully it will continue to prosper. A win for Kilmoyley at the weekend would be an almighty boost. Hope they do it.

foreveryoung (USA) - Posts: 1149 - 01/02/2022 14:30:16    2397725

Link

Replying To foreveryoung:  "
Replying To MikeRoger:  "[quote=foreveryoung:  "[quote=MikeRoger:  "With five strong hurling powers in Munster, Kerry is usually grouped withy developing and weaker counties.
But in recent years both Camogie and Hurling have been undergoing a slow but steady renaissance in the greater Tralee area. Green shoots also in the Killarney area. Traditionally the big 8 senior clubs in North Kerry demark the hurling stronghold. But new names are starting to come to the table. Dr. Crokes broke the glass ceiling a couple of seasons ago, winning the Intermediate Hurling tile and unlike their predecessors, opting to join the top table as a reward.

On the Camogie side, Tralee Parnells have a growing juvenile and teenage membership that is now the largest in the county. With plans to expand and play more games this season, the Camogie management have launched a recruitment drive. (Details at this link.)

The club are now also coming of age on the hurling side, with the under 21s securing the first Tralee adult silverware in over a century. (Story at this link .)

What do others who have been in similar situations think? What are the dos and don'ts for growing clubs like these, on the development track in non-traditional Hurling and Camogie areas and what lessons learned elsewhere may be applicable?"
Stacks won the senior hurling championship in 1933. Doesn't that count as Tralee adult silverware within 100 years?"
.
Thanks for spotting that typo. The post should of course specify tralee-parnells-first-adult-silverware as it has it correctly in the link to
https://traleeparnellshurling.blogspot.com/2022/01/tralee-parnells-first-adult-silverware.html

But being new to this forum, having looked around, I have not figured out yet how to edit / correct a post. Would anyone who is more familiar with the hoganstand Forum be able to tell, how a correction can be made in a case like this please?"]I don't know how to change stuff either. However, there's no need to change it. It's not such a big issue. I greatly enjoyed reading your post, and as many others have said, it's great news.

Also, I've read that Rathmore might be entering a hurling team this year.

Kerry hurling is on the up at the moment. Hopefully it will continue to prosper. A win for Kilmoyley at the weekend would be an almighty boost. Hope they do it."]Yes foreveryoung I agree, lots of good news in Kerry Hurling and Camogie development. Kilmoyley are blazing a trail getting out of Munster and I do hope they go all the way, it is bringing great exposure to the progress in The Kingdom.

Mighty to see Rathmore progressing, Eoin and few more stalwarts have been keeping the underage structures going there for as many years as I have been in Tralee. Very encouraging to see Camogie in new schools every year now, including Castleisland, Listowel, Ballybunion. It would be good as a next step to see more population centers further south joining in, including Killorglin and Cahersiveen, to bring more games exposure to those catchments.

In the meantime, on with the jobs in hand, including adult Camogie recruitment in Tralee

https://traleeparnellshurling.blogspot.com/2022/01/tralee-parnells-adult-camogie.html

as posted at

https://traleeparnellshurling.blogspot.com/

MikeRoger (Kerry) - Posts: 8 - 01/02/2022 18:40:32    2397800

Link

Replying To MikeRoger:  "
Replying To foreveryoung:  "[quote=MikeRoger:  "[quote=foreveryoung:  "[quote=MikeRoger:  "With five strong hurling powers in Munster, Kerry is usually grouped withy developing and weaker counties.
But in recent years both Camogie and Hurling have been undergoing a slow but steady renaissance in the greater Tralee area. Green shoots also in the Killarney area. Traditionally the big 8 senior clubs in North Kerry demark the hurling stronghold. But new names are starting to come to the table. Dr. Crokes broke the glass ceiling a couple of seasons ago, winning the Intermediate Hurling tile and unlike their predecessors, opting to join the top table as a reward.

On the Camogie side, Tralee Parnells have a growing juvenile and teenage membership that is now the largest in the county. With plans to expand and play more games this season, the Camogie management have launched a recruitment drive. (Details at this link.)

The club are now also coming of age on the hurling side, with the under 21s securing the first Tralee adult silverware in over a century. (Story at this link .)

What do others who have been in similar situations think? What are the dos and don'ts for growing clubs like these, on the development track in non-traditional Hurling and Camogie areas and what lessons learned elsewhere may be applicable?"
Stacks won the senior hurling championship in 1933. Doesn't that count as Tralee adult silverware within 100 years?"
.
Thanks for spotting that typo. The post should of course specify tralee-parnells-first-adult-silverware as it has it correctly in the link to
https://traleeparnellshurling.blogspot.com/2022/01/tralee-parnells-first-adult-silverware.html

But being new to this forum, having looked around, I have not figured out yet how to edit / correct a post. Would anyone who is more familiar with the hoganstand Forum be able to tell, how a correction can be made in a case like this please?"]I don't know how to change stuff either. However, there's no need to change it. It's not such a big issue. I greatly enjoyed reading your post, and as many others have said, it's great news.

Also, I've read that Rathmore might be entering a hurling team this year.

Kerry hurling is on the up at the moment. Hopefully it will continue to prosper. A win for Kilmoyley at the weekend would be an almighty boost. Hope they do it."]Yes foreveryoung I agree, lots of good news in Kerry Hurling and Camogie development. Kilmoyley are blazing a trail getting out of Munster and I do hope they go all the way, it is bringing great exposure to the progress in The Kingdom.

Mighty to see Rathmore progressing, Eoin and few more stalwarts have been keeping the underage structures going there for as many years as I have been in Tralee. Very encouraging to see Camogie in new schools every year now, including Castleisland, Listowel, Ballybunion. It would be good as a next step to see more population centers further south joining in, including Killorglin and Cahersiveen, to bring more games exposure to those catchments.

In the meantime, on with the jobs in hand, including adult Camogie recruitment in Tralee

https://traleeparnellshurling.blogspot.com/2022/01/tralee-parnells-adult-camogie.html

as posted at

https://traleeparnellshurling.blogspot.com/"]Many camógie clubs in Kerry? I only know of Clanmaurice.

keeper7 (Longford) - Posts: 4024 - 01/02/2022 22:00:13    2397839

Link

Replying To keeper7:  "
Replying To MikeRoger:  "[quote=foreveryoung:  "[quote=MikeRoger:  "[quote=foreveryoung:  "[quote=MikeRoger:  "With five strong hurling powers in Munster, Kerry is usually grouped withy developing and weaker counties.
But in recent years both Camogie and Hurling have been undergoing a slow but steady renaissance in the greater Tralee area. Green shoots also in the Killarney area. Traditionally the big 8 senior clubs in North Kerry demark the hurling stronghold. But new names are starting to come to the table. Dr. Crokes broke the glass ceiling a couple of seasons ago, winning the Intermediate Hurling tile and unlike their predecessors, opting to join the top table as a reward.

On the Camogie side, Tralee Parnells have a growing juvenile and teenage membership that is now the largest in the county. With plans to expand and play more games this season, the Camogie management have launched a recruitment drive. (Details at this link.)

The club are now also coming of age on the hurling side, with the under 21s securing the first Tralee adult silverware in over a century. (Story at this link .)

What do others who have been in similar situations think? What are the dos and don'ts for growing clubs like these, on the development track in non-traditional Hurling and Camogie areas and what lessons learned elsewhere may be applicable?"
Stacks won the senior hurling championship in 1933. Doesn't that count as Tralee adult silverware within 100 years?"
.
Thanks for spotting that typo. The post should of course specify tralee-parnells-first-adult-silverware as it has it correctly in the link to
https://traleeparnellshurling.blogspot.com/2022/01/tralee-parnells-first-adult-silverware.html

But being new to this forum, having looked around, I have not figured out yet how to edit / correct a post. Would anyone who is more familiar with the hoganstand Forum be able to tell, how a correction can be made in a case like this please?"]I don't know how to change stuff either. However, there's no need to change it. It's not such a big issue. I greatly enjoyed reading your post, and as many others have said, it's great news.

Also, I've read that Rathmore might be entering a hurling team this year.

Kerry hurling is on the up at the moment. Hopefully it will continue to prosper. A win for Kilmoyley at the weekend would be an almighty boost. Hope they do it."]Yes foreveryoung I agree, lots of good news in Kerry Hurling and Camogie development. Kilmoyley are blazing a trail getting out of Munster and I do hope they go all the way, it is bringing great exposure to the progress in The Kingdom.

Mighty to see Rathmore progressing, Eoin and few more stalwarts have been keeping the underage structures going there for as many years as I have been in Tralee. Very encouraging to see Camogie in new schools every year now, including Castleisland, Listowel, Ballybunion. It would be good as a next step to see more population centers further south joining in, including Killorglin and Cahersiveen, to bring more games exposure to those catchments.

In the meantime, on with the jobs in hand, including adult Camogie recruitment in Tralee

https://traleeparnellshurling.blogspot.com/2022/01/tralee-parnells-adult-camogie.html

as posted at

https://traleeparnellshurling.blogspot.com/"]Many camógie clubs in Kerry? I only know of Clanmaurice."].
Hi keeper7,
.
Yes Clanmaurice are around a few years and have the bulk of Kerry intercounty adult players. They have had success outside the county, which is great for the profile of Camogie in Kerry.
.
In the last couple of years there are 3 clubs newly playing adult junior level Camogie.
These are Causeway https://www.facebook.com/causewaycamogie/, CillArd https://www.facebook.com/cillardcamogie/ and Tralee Parnells https://www.facebook.com/TraleeParnellsHurlingClub/ who all have growing number in their juvenile teams.
.
In 2020 Killarney https://www.facebook.com/killarneycamogieclub/ will join those 3 for the first time in the minor competitions in Kerry and hopefully will drive on soon to compete at junior to bring it up to four in the county at junior grade.
.
Not far behind are the 3 other newer clubs Sliabh Luachra (centered around Castleisland) https://www.facebook.com/sliabhluachracamogie, AbbeyKilLix (Camogie club serving Abbeydorney, Kilflynn and Lixnaw) https://www.facebook.com/abbeykillix and Ballyduff https://www.facebook.com/ballyduff.camogie where these is a strong established hurling club which is always a boon in terms of coaching knowledge and availability.
.
All of these clubs have been successfully recruiting increased numbers at primary and secondary school ages, with record enrollments in 2021. So the coming years look bright for Camogie in The Kingdom, if it can continue on this very encouraging upward trajectory.
.

MikeRoger (Kerry) - Posts: 8 - 02/02/2022 13:08:04    2397938

Link

Replying To MikeRoger:  "
Replying To foreveryoung:  "[quote=MikeRoger:  "With five strong hurling powers in Munster, Kerry is usually grouped withy developing and weaker counties.
But in recent years both Camogie and Hurling have been undergoing a slow but steady renaissance in the greater Tralee area. Green shoots also in the Killarney area. Traditionally the big 8 senior clubs in North Kerry demark the hurling stronghold. But new names are starting to come to the table. Dr. Crokes broke the glass ceiling a couple of seasons ago, winning the Intermediate Hurling tile and unlike their predecessors, opting to join the top table as a reward.

On the Camogie side, Tralee Parnells have a growing juvenile and teenage membership that is now the largest in the county. With plans to expand and play more games this season, the Camogie management have launched a recruitment drive. (Details at this link.)

The club are now also coming of age on the hurling side, with the under 21s securing the first Tralee adult silverware in over a century. (Story at this link .)

What do others who have been in similar situations think? What are the dos and don'ts for growing clubs like these, on the development track in non-traditional Hurling and Camogie areas and what lessons learned elsewhere may be applicable?"
Stacks won the senior hurling championship in 1933. Doesn't that count as Tralee adult silverware within 100 years?"
.
Thanks for spotting that typo. The post should of course specify tralee-parnells-first-adult-silverware as it has it correctly in the link to
https://traleeparnellshurling.blogspot.com/2022/01/tralee-parnells-first-adult-silverware.html

But being new to this forum, having looked around, I have not figured out yet how to edit / correct a post. Would anyone who is more familiar with the hoganstand Forum be able to tell, how a correction can be made in a case like this please?"]You cant edit or correct a post. its a very outdated format so you cant do it

KillingFields (Limerick) - Posts: 2698 - 02/02/2022 13:49:52    2397954

Link

Replying To MikeRoger:  "
Replying To foreveryoung:  "[quote=MikeRoger:  "With five strong hurling powers in Munster, Kerry is usually grouped withy developing and weaker counties.
But in recent years both Camogie and Hurling have been undergoing a slow but steady renaissance in the greater Tralee area. Green shoots also in the Killarney area. Traditionally the big 8 senior clubs in North Kerry demark the hurling stronghold. But new names are starting to come to the table. Dr. Crokes broke the glass ceiling a couple of seasons ago, winning the Intermediate Hurling tile and unlike their predecessors, opting to join the top table as a reward.

On the Camogie side, Tralee Parnells have a growing juvenile and teenage membership that is now the largest in the county. With plans to expand and play more games this season, the Camogie management have launched a recruitment drive. (Details at this link.)

The club are now also coming of age on the hurling side, with the under 21s securing the first Tralee adult silverware in over a century. (Story at this link .)

What do others who have been in similar situations think? What are the dos and don'ts for growing clubs like these, on the development track in non-traditional Hurling and Camogie areas and what lessons learned elsewhere may be applicable?"
Stacks won the senior hurling championship in 1933. Doesn't that count as Tralee adult silverware within 100 years?"
.
Thanks for spotting that typo. The post should of course specify tralee-parnells-first-adult-silverware as it has it correctly in the link to
https://traleeparnellshurling.blogspot.com/2022/01/tralee-parnells-first-adult-silverware.html

But being new to this forum, having looked around, I have not figured out yet how to edit / correct a post. Would anyone who is more familiar with the hoganstand Forum be able to tell, how a correction can be made in a case like this please?"]You cant edit or correct a post. its a very outdated format so you cant do it

KillingFields (Limerick) - Posts: 2698 - 02/02/2022 13:49:57    2397955

Link